Quick Review: Mac OS X Lion

Yesterday as a field day for all Mac users awaiting for Apple to push the button that releases the Lion from it its cage. I’m referring of course to the OS X Lion which Apple calls as the “most advanced desktop operating system.” How many new features did Apple mentioned? – 250.

One thing that made me pretty excited about the Lion’s release is the fact that I will be getting it the same time as my co-writers here in Appletell. Thanks to Apple for making the update available on the Mac App Store. Unfortunately, my broadband connection at home didn’t cooperate. While others have been posting on Google+ that they have successfully installed the OS X Lion, there I was watching the download progress like it will take forever to finish. In short, I left the download process to run and dreamt of the Lion roaring unto my iMac when I wake in the morning.

In short, upon waking up the download was finished. I immediately fire up the installer. It took 30 minutes to finish the installation so I was able to prepare myself for my work. And just before I left home, I was able to explore some of the salient features of Lion.

1. I was not really impressed by the Launchpad. I mean, I’m contented with the apps toolbar sitting on the lower part of the iMac’s screen. And I rarely go through all the apps installed on my iMac anyway, so I really couldn’t see how this will make my life easier.

2. One great thing about the Launchpad is the you pull it out and push it in – that is by swiping five fingers onto the trackpad in outward/inward motion.

2. Then there’s the Mission Control. At first, I said, what the heck is this? But when I learned about its functionality then that’s time I appreciate it. With Mission Control, you can see which desktops and apps are currently open. You can switch from one desktop to another and use all the open apps in that desktop. You can add more desktops if you want, then open apps so that you can seggregate your work apps from your play apps. Got what I mean?

3. The full screen apps feature is pretty cool and easier to do than the old way of pulling out the window to expand its view. The only low down is here is that not all apps and software support Lion yet. So, the full screen apps may not work.

4. The multitouch gestures are helpful and the experience is almost the same as doing it on an iPad. Lion comes with the reverse scrolling by default. This is simply the reverse of what were are all used to. If you don’t want it, you can simply turn it off from the Settings tab.

5. The Safari browser was slightly improved. It’s slightly faster than the previous version. The right swipe gesture for navigating through tabs is pretty cool.

6. The “swipe to right” gesture to switch between apps is great. This is by far my favorite feature.

7. The icons in the finder looks slicker than they were in Snow Leopard. The overall redesign gives it a punkier look.

I have yet to fully explore the functionality of OS X Lion. But so far, I would have to agree with Apple that is by far the most advanced desktop OS, for its Mac products.

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4 Comments

  1. I immediately fire up the installer. It took 30 minutes to finish the installation so I was able to prepare myself for my work. And just before I left home, I was able to explore some of the salient features of Lion.

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